How to Write Like a Pro in a New Content Niche

Here’s how to pivot your style and approach to write informative, engaging content in a new niche – Content Marketing Institute.

Source: contentmarketinginstitute.com

I want to share this great, very detailed article on creating content for a niche. Although not specific to law firm marketing, the concepts are the same.

One thing you should be doing is to monitor the most popular articles on your own blogs, in order to provide more of that sort of content. In this article, you'll learn how to do the same for other blogs, in order to increase your awareness even further.

If you want to take your firm to new levels with an effective content marketing plan, be sure to read my Niche Marketing Roadmap series.

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How Does Google Work?

In my book, How to Create a Big, Fat Pipeline of New Clients for Your Law Firm in Just 10 Days, I discuss all the factors Google looks at to determine which search results will appear on page one.

I came across this very good video that discusses the issues as well, and provides a basic summary of how Google works. The video covers only the basics, but I really like the example used to explain incoming links, which also covers the importance of proper anchor text. I also appreciate that the author never tries to sell anything.

As set forth in How to Create a Big, Fat Pipeline, backlinks are important, and they are something you should strive for, but as I show, you can land on page one with no backlinks.

Enjoy!

Five Reasons Attorneys Fall for SEO Scams

In my book, How to Create a Big, Fat Pipeline of New Clients for Your Law Firm in Just 10 Days, I provide the following anecdote:

There is a classic Peanuts comic, where Linus is going door to door trying to sell wadded up pieces of paper as cat toys. His sales presentation is good, but he never makes a sale. He asks the cat owners to picture the hours of fun their cats will have playing with the wadded up piece of paper. Nonetheless, he can’t get past the fact that he’s selling wadded up pieces of paper. He loses the sale every time, because the prospective customers realize and explain that they can wad up their own pieces of paper.

I don’t know why that comic stuck with me, but I see it played out over and over in real life, especially on the Internet. To this day, solo practitioners who can’t afford it are spending thousands of dollars to have people build websites for them. To fulfill my continuing education requirements, I was at a law firm marketing seminar recently where someone claimed that incoming links are essential to successful search engine optimization (SEO). He claimed that you should have 30,000 incoming links to your site, and as luck would have it, he just happened to offer a link-building service for the “limited time, have to buy it now or the offer is lost for ever” price of $1,950 per month. He normally required a one year commitment, but attorneys signing up on the spot only had to commit to six months. Attorneys were lined up to pay $1,950 per month — a total commitment of almost $12,000 — for incoming links to a single website! The website fiverr.com offers 50,000 incoming links for just $5, and they are just as worthless as what this person was offering.

These sorts of absurd SEO claims and pricing are far too commonplace. By accident or design, many so-called SEO experts mystify the process so that you won’t realize it’s just wadded up pieces of paper, and you can wad your own paper, thank you very much.

I came across an interesting article by Jared Jorde entitled 5 Reasons Attorneys are Easy Marks for SEO Scams on a blog called LawLytics. Jorde has apparently witnessed the same sort of nonsense I reported, and provides a detailed look at the reasons behind the phenomenon. The article is worth a read to make sure you don’t fall prey to one of the scams yourself.

In Big Fat Pipeline, I explain how to create your own websites for just $6 per month, and I use that as a point of reference when someone is offering to create websites for me. I have no objection to farming out that work, and although I have no experience with LawLytics, I’d bet their websites are fancier than my own meager efforts. You went to law school to practice law, not to create websites. So by all means allow the pros to create your sites if your budget permits, but just keep in mind that it isn't magic, and you can wad your own paper.

Something to Consider When Advising Your Clients About Litigation or Appeal

Are you presenting a meritless defense?
Too many attorneys defend cases that have no defense.

Over the years I have been sorely disappointed to learn that many attorneys don’t see a problem with that, and have no clue that it is not permitted. In California, for example, the Rules of Professional Conduct prohibit accepting employment by a client if the objective of such employment is “to present a claim or defense in litigation that is not warranted under existing law, unless it can be supported by a good faith argument for an extension, modification, or reversal of such existing law.” Some cases are not black and white, and that is why ours is an advocacy system, but some are entirely clear and not open to debate. If someone borrows money and does not pay it back pursuant to the terms of the agreement, so long as there is no issue of contract interpretation or other issue, there is no defense. A defendant in that case should not be able to find any attorney to represent him.

But let’s set aside the ethical considerations for a moment, and look at this from a different angle. I would hope that any attorney, whatever the motivation for taking the case, would want to do a good job for the client. Always consider whether a defense could actually put the defendant in a worse position, and advise the client of that possibility. Here are two cases from my practice that illustrate what I am talking about.

The case of the defaming doctor.

In the first case, we brought an action against a doctor who had defamed our client. When the doctor’s contract at a hospital was not renewed, she decided our client was to blame. She took to the Internet and posted false comments about his job performance, in some cases assuming the false identity of a nurse and in others a patient. When we presented irrefutable proof that she had published the anonymous comments, she admitted what she had done. If ever there was a case that should have settled, this was one, but her insurer picked up coverage and for unknown reasons decided to fight the case right through trial, despite our very reasonable settlement demand.

The result was disastrous for the doctor. Continue reading

“Freemiums” are a Great Law Firm Marketing Tool

Use Freemiums to Market your own law firm
“Freemium” is a business model that works by offering a product or service free of charge (typically digital offerings such as eBooks) while charging a premium for advanced features, functionality, or related products and services. The word “freemium” is a portmanteau* combining the two aspects of the business model: “free” and “premium”.  Thanks Wikipedia.

Freemiums are a great way to promote a law firm.  A potential client visits your blog and is greeted with an offer of an essential report for free.  And why would you do that? Because you must capture the client's email address in order to provide the free report.  This allows you to follow up with the potential client, and the report with all your contact information remains in the hands of the potential client so he or she can contact you when ready.

Clients shop for attorneys. Hopefully your website will be enough to generate a call, but that may not seal the deal. On many occasions a potential client has called, I've wowed them with my fount of knowledge, and sent them back to my assistant to schedule an appointment. A few minutes later, the phone rings again, and it is the same client calling to discuss the case, not realizing she is calling the same firm. She is just working her way down the Google results and calling every attorney she finds.  A freemium can distinguish you from the pack of attorneys clients are going to call. Continue reading